I've been following this story in Maine where a nonprofit group is trying to get open-air cremations legalized as another option for saying goodbye to our loved ones. While movement on the proposal has halted in the past six months, the idea does appear to offer some benefits.

When most people think of a traditional burial, cemeteries and crematoriums come to mind. Long before deceased human beings were fed into a machine that reduced bodies to ashes in a matter of seconds, open-air cremations were the traditional way to handle the dead. This method is still being done in many countries.

The nonprofit group Good Ground, Great Beyond, has been working on getting this type of ancient method of disposing of the dead legalized on a 63-acre space of land in the state of Maine. The proposal was presented back in March, and has since gone dormant as far as talks are concerned.

I read recently that in Europe owners of cemeteries are recycling burial plots to combat overcrowding. Think about what cemeteries are going to look like in another 30 years. Are we going to keep plowing up land to store the dead? It doesn't make sense.

An open-air cremation is just a human landfill, and I believe there are families out there that might prefer this style of cremation over what has become the traditional method. I recently rewatched the film Captain Fantastic, and the funeral pyre scene in which the family says goodbye to mom moves me every time.

Would you support this idea in the state of Idaho?

Badger Fire Aftermath

CSI Fall Leaves

LOOK: The most popular biblical baby names

To determine the most popular biblical baby names, Stacker consulted the name origin site Behind the Name and the Social Security Administration's baby names database then ranked the top 50 names from Behind the Name's Biblical Names origins list of 564 names, based on how many babies had been given these names in 2019. Click through to find out which biblical names have stood the test of time.
Get our free mobile app